Up Next: Kneehigh's 946 and Enda Walsh's ARLINGTON

946: THE AMAZING STORY OF ADOLPHUS TIPS
MAR 16-APR 9, 2017
Tickets Start at $35 | BUY TICKETS>>
Kneehigh bring their full arsenal of live music, dance and visual hi jinx back to St. Ann’s with this new adaptation of a book by the author of War Horse.

ARLINGTON
MAY 3-28, 2017
Tickets Start at $45 | BUY TICKETS>>
In May, join us for Enda Walsh’s Arlington, where “dance, art and poetry explode in [this] brave new world” (The Guardian).

Abbey Talk Series: Meet the Makers, Oona Doherty

An interview with the award winning dance artist Oona Doherty on her work and shorthand with choreographer Emma Martin, the intention of the moment, destroying the silence, and the residue of memory on the body.

Recorded at the Abbey Theatre on 15 February 2017.
Interviewer & Sound Editor: Lisa Farrelly.

Olivier Winner Denise Gough to Bring People, Places & Things to St. Ann's Warehouse

“Duncan Macmillan’s acclaimed play People, Places & Things will have its American premiere at St. Ann’s Warehouse October 19-November 19.

Denise Gough, who originated the role of Emma and won an Oliver Award in 2016, will reprise her performance in the New York mounting. The work is a collaboration between St. Ann’s Warehouse, the National Theatre, and Headlong, in association with Bryan Singer Productions.”

via TheaterMania, READ MORE.

Photo: Jason Bell

Review: In ‘The Tempest,’ Liberation and Exhilaration

This “Tempest” is the third and last installment of the director Phyllida Lloyd’s triumphant series of Shakespeare plays for Donmar Warehouse in London, in which women play every role. It is the most purely pleasurable of the trilogy and the most entertaining “Tempest” I’ve ever seen.

– Ben Brantley for The New York Times, READ MORE.

Photo: Sara Krulwich

The Gender’s the Thing: Harriet Walter Plays Shakespeare’s Heroes as Heroines

“Back in 2007, Harriet Walter thought she was done with Shakespeare. Over the decades, the British actress had taken on some of his major female characters, including Viola, Lady Macbeth and Beatrice, and she had just completed a successful West End run in “Antony and Cleopatra” opposite Patrick Stewart. “I felt I was just getting comfortable,” Ms. Walter recently said, smiling slightly. “But then — basta!”

The problem wasn’t that this actor’s actor, revered by her peers, had lost interest. The problem was that she was nearing 60 and the playwright just didn’t offer big roles for older women.

So she turned to his men.”

READ MORE: The New York Times
Photo: George Etheredge