ST. ANN’S WAREHOUSE PRESENTS THE U.S. PREMIERE OF THE JUNGLE, BEGINNING DECEMBER 4

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Written by Good Chance Theatre Founders and Artistic Directors Joe Murphy and Joe Robertson, and Directed by Stephen Daldry and Justin Martin, The Jungle Brings to Life the Powerful, Short-Lived, Self-Governing Society of the Jungle, a Refugee Camp in Northern France

“This extraordinary play…is vivid and complex in its portrayal of human resilience in the face of humanitarian catastrophe.” — The Guardian

St. Ann’s Warehouse will present the U.S. Premiere of The Jungle, the immensely acclaimed Good Chance Theatre co-production with the National Theatreand Young Vic. Currently opening a five-month run at London’s Playhouse Theatre on the West End, The Jungle comes to St. Ann’s beginning December 4, 2018. The play is a vital remembrance of the now bulldozed camp in Calais, France known as the Jungle, where thousands of refugees who had escaped drought, war, and strife-torn countries in Africa and the Middle East waited for their “good chance” passage to Britain.  The production has been energizing an international conversation around immigration, borders, and the lived experiences of refugees ever since its momentous first performances exploded at the Young Vic theatre last December.

Photo: David Sandison

The B-Side and Grief Is the Thing With Feathers ON SALE NOW!

Off the heals of announcing the cast for its remount of the Bard SummerScape production of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Oklahoma! this fall, St. Ann’s Warehouse has added two new productions to its upcoming season.

Joining the 2018–2019 lineup are The Wooster Group’s production of The B-Side: “Negro Folklore from Texas State Prisons,” A Record Album Interpretation, starring co-creator Eric Berryman; and Wayward Productions’ Grief Is the Thing with Feathers by Max Porter, adapted and directed by Enda Walsh, and starring Cillian Murphy.

CRITIC’S PICK

Review: There’s a Dark, Golden Haze in This Reclaimed ‘Oklahoma!’

BRANTLEY Mr. Fish is providing a stark illumination that allows those homesteaders we once thought were so wholesome no place to hide, even when it’s pitch dark. What’s so thrilling about this exposure of what lies beneath is that you feel it was always there, waiting to be excavated.

GREEN Astonishingly, not a word has been added to Hammerstein’s book, nor any major liberties taken with the Rodgers and Hammerstein songs. Yet the whole thing feels much more intimate because of the context.

 

READ THE NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW >>